Car Accessories

By Mike | 29th July 2012 | Category: Car Accessories | Leave a comment

Few of us love cleaning our cars. That enormous amount of bubbles and soap may look good in a 1980’s music video featuring bikini-clad supermodels, but few would suggest that is a fun pastime. Luckily for us, a small company has created a new coating system that will make those dreaded cleaning sessions a thing of the past, ushering in a sparkling revolution.

Research conducted at the Netherlands’ Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) has revealed a complex coat of highly water-resistant and antibacterial properties like no other. Researcher Catarina Esteves of the Chemical Engineering department claims that they’ve solved a problem with “development of source that place the functional chemical groups at the end of special stalks that are mixed through the coating.”

What is even more interesting about this coating system is that it promises to have ‘self-healing’ properties that will mask small scratches on our cars surfaces. Academics suggest that their nano-sized molecular groups unlike other coating systems act in such as way that makes irreversible damage disappear with a small coat of their special product.

This will mean that it will contain self-cleaning properties for long periods so those small splashes or rainstorms won’t affect our cars. Similarly, small bumps and bruises sustained at the supermarket will be gone by the time you get back. It’s certainly a wonderful future if this product acts as well as researchers says it does. It will at the very least save us a lot of money and grief in the long run.

With a wide application in mobile phones, clean fingerprints, as well as certainly be used on airplanes, this may well be a new age in the paint industry.  Indeed, reporters have also suggested that it may reduce fuel consultation to cleaner surfaces with less air resistances, as well as prevent algae from growing on our cars. While it may be a long while before we begin to see this type of paint appearing on our cars, experts suggest that it will become standardized within the next six to eight years, offering us all smooth and shiny cars.

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